shy-town:

PIKACHU COOKING SET GIVEAWAY!~

Okay so I got two of these sets and I have no use for the other one so I thought I should do a tumblr giveaway. This set is kinda rare and cost a lot of money. So this is kinda a life time chance here people. They are brand new still in the box. Also I will be shipping internationally. <3

Rules:

  1. You MUST be following me.
  2. You can reblog as many times as you want.

The set includes:

  1. Pot
  2. Kettle
  3. Cutting broad
  4. Cooking utensils
  5. Tupperware
  6. Pikachu mug

The giveaway ends on April 15th 2013! 

Good luck everyone!~

Also I have a 3DS laying around that I don’t use cause I have a XL now so I will throw that in too. <3

(via pikarar)

This was posted 1 year ago. It has 30,653 notes.

fuckyeahhylia:

THE LINKREDIBLE GIVEAWAY! 

To celebrate the launch of our new blog fuckyeahhylia, we have decided to have an amazing giveaway for the lovely people of tumblr. There are two prizes including a Wii U: Premium Pack (Black) and a Nintendo 3DS: The Legend of Zelda Limited Edition. The deadline and drawing date is on the bottom.

PRIZE INFORMATION

Wii U: Premium Pack (Black) - The reason for me giving away such a prize is because I had won the Wii U for free at a raffle, even though I already had my own. At first I wanted to sell the whole pack, but with the release of Wind Waker HD coming to the Wii U, I would rather a legitimate and deserving Nintendo fan get the opportunity to play it instead of someone attempting to buy it off me to save a few bucks. However, I do want at least SOME money out of it, so I will be selling the NintendoLand game elsewhere. Therefore, the NintendoLand software that is included with the Premium Pack will NOT be included in this giveaway.  Other than that, the console itself is brand-spanking new (unused), and is packed and ready to be given to the lucky winner.

For more details on the Wii U: Premium Pack (Black) prize, message Noel on either his blog or fuckyeahhylia.

~

Nintendo 3DS: The Legend of Zelda Limited Edition - People around tumblr have always been sulking about not having this limited edition Zelda 3DS. I won this $100 prepaid visa gift card at an orchestra banquet last year and I hadn’t used it, apparently. So, I decided to search for the 3DS on eBay and I was actually surprised to find one under the budget! Gave the card to my mother and she took care of the rest. It’s in pretty great condition, barely used, all the functions are fine, the screen is as sharp as a tack. However, this was just for the hand-held device, not Ocarina of Time 3DS. I can’t provide for everything! Also, it didn’t come in the original packaging, so I’ll send it bubble wrapped and safe inside a small box. Charger and stand included.

For more details on the Nintendo 3DS: The Legend of Zelda Limited Edition prize, message Elly on either her blog or fuckyeahhylia.

HOW TO ENTER

To enter the draw, you must be following fuckyeahhylia since this is to celebrate our blog’s launch.

  • REBLOG ONLY ONCE
  • NO LIKES (unless it’s to come back to the original post)
  • Your reblog will count as one (1) entry.

BONUS (now this is where it get’s interesting)

ADDITIONAL DETAILS

  • You may only win up to one prize to make the giveaway more fun and interesting. However, you may request to switch to the other prize if the other winner is willing to.
  • Every url taking part will be written down on {x} amounts of paper slips depending on your amounts of entries and will be placed into a lottery bowl. There will be a total of two lotteries, one lottery by Noel determining the winner of the Wii U and the reserves, and the other lottery by Elly determining the winner of the 3DS and the reserves. The drawings of the url out of the lottery will be filmed and uploaded onto fuckyeahhylia to prove fairness in the draw.
  • There are no limits to where the prizes can be shipped to (in other words, can be shipped internationally). However, the prizes may take up to 8-12 working days to ship until you receive the prize. You must be able to provide us your address.
  • If you change your URL, deactivate your account etc. before the end of the lottery, a new winner will be announced.

The cutoff deadline for the giveaway is March 25th, 2013,  12:00AM EST. The drawing will be uploaded on March 30th, 2013, 8:30PM EST. Have fun and good luck!

(via pikarar)

This was posted 1 year ago. It has 9,537 notes.

Reblog, go on your blog, and click the triangle.

kcalron:

deadpool-the-assassin:

not-talking:


I JUST SPENT LIKE AN 1 HOUR OF MY LIFE ON THIS, GENIUS


this is legit so sick. 

mindfuck

whoaaa

this is AMAZING

EVERYONE DO IT aaaaaaaaa

this is sooooo sick oh my god!!!

Whoa.

3, 18, and 23 are probably my favourites.

done it before.. here followers amuse yourself

Mod: SO MUCH AWESOME!!!!

Deadpool: 

4 gave me orgasms.

OH GOD OH GOD OH GOD. 12 WAS EVERYTHING I NEEDED!!

18. Oh yea, imma touch you like that ;)

THIS WHOLE THING AMUSED ME TO SUCH AN EXTENT. DO IT.

This was posted 1 year ago. It has 312,759 notes.
brbnightmares:

Happy Birthday to Kathy Acker, a dead woman.
I hereby induct her officially into the hallowed halls of Whateverism.
A quote from her posted on Facebook was her statament that her mission was “Be a warrior for something.”
I’m more like “Be a warrior… or something.” But you know, whatever.

brbnightmares:

Happy Birthday to Kathy Acker, a dead woman.

I hereby induct her officially into the hallowed halls of Whateverism.

A quote from her posted on Facebook was her statament that her mission was “Be a warrior for something.”

I’m more like “Be a warrior… or something.” But you know, whatever.

(Source: brbnightmares, via )

This was posted 1 year ago. It has 43 notes. .

1337status:

 

Nintendo 3DS: Cosmic Black GIVEAWAY!

Hey guys as promised here is something I got that I want to share with you. =] I’m going to be honest and say that I don’t have too much use for this thing, so I would love to pass it onto one lucky follower. I know this is a messed up way to gain publicity, but with more support I will be able to get more awesome stuff out to you guys like this.

As for the Pokéwalkers, I was planning on doing an Ash thing with six of them (the sixth being the one I actually own) but decided not to. So I don’t need them anymore.

THE RULES: 

- You must be in the U.S.

- You must be a FOLLOWER.

- You must REBLOG this post, that will be your entry. LIKING the post will also count as an entry but is entirely up to you.

-  Winners: you will have 24 HOURS to message me back after I message you,or I will just pick again.

- People who don’t win: Be sure to stay tuned to see what else I’ll be giving away!

- Contest will end August 20, 2011 at 10PM PST. Winners will be selected the morning after.

HOW WINNERS WILL BE SELECTED: 

I will copy and paste the notes into Word. I will number the notes. Then, I will use Random.org to pick the result. After finding someone through the notes I will check to see if you are following me.

Runner-ups will recieve 1 of 5 Pokéwalkers!

Good Luck everyone, and be sure to leave something in my ask box if you have any questions.

This was posted 2 years ago. It has 2,843 notes.
hyperallergic:

Winsor McCay, a full “Little Nemo in Slumberland” strip, taken from the collection Little Nemo in Slumberland, So Many Splendid Sundays Appearing in newspapers from 1905 - 1914, “Little Nemo in Slumberland“‘s fantastic imagery and playful use of the form of comics serves as an important influence for generations of comics and cartoons. Jeet Heer discusses McCay’s practice and place in the history of the world of comics in the Virginia Quarterly Review:
Created in the wake of the Chicago Columbian Exposition of 1893, Little Nemo was as much an architectural fantasy as a fairy tale. McCay delighted in creating pristine fictional palaces, rich in colonnades and endless hallways. Like a child playing in a sandlot, he also took pleasure in tearing down what he had so quickly created. The fertility of McCay’s imagination is both daunting and troubling. His mind moved too quickly to linger over his own creations too long. His need to create a quick succession of fresh images gives his work the rushed unreality of dreams, and sometimes the insubstantiality of dreams as well. McCay’s most important innovation as an artist was his close attention to movement. Half a generation before McCay, the photographer Eadweard Muybridge had already revolutionized our sense of how bodies move through space with his time-lapse studies of horses. McCay never directly copied from photographs, relying instead on his remarkable eidetic memory, but he internalized the lessons of Muybridge. All of McCay’s characters, from flying mosquitoes to scampering little boys to trotting horses, move with the fluency of life. Because comics are a succession of images, frozen when seen in isolation but moving as we read the page, McCay’s attention to motion brought to the foreground the distinctive aesthetic of the art form. McCay’s reliance on memory as his chief storehouse of images is further evidence of his deep insight into the nature of comics. Chris Ware, a sharp theorist of art as well as a greatly talented cartoonist, has repeatedly argued that comics are memory-drawings rather than life-drawings. “A cartoon is not an image taken from life,” Ware notes. “A cartoon is taken from memory. You’re trying to distill the memory of an experience, not the experience itself.” Unlike a painter or an illustrator working in front of a model, a cartoonist is drawing images in sequence that must possess narrative flow. Memories, which are fleeting images in a hazy sequence, are the closest cognitive parallel for how comics work. (Dreams, of course, are nighttime memories, sharing the sequential fuzziness of retrospective thought.)
 Click through for a larger image.

hyperallergic:

Winsor McCay, a full “Little Nemo in Slumberland” strip, taken from the collection Little Nemo in Slumberland, So Many Splendid Sundays

Appearing in newspapers from 1905 - 1914, “Little Nemo in Slumberland“‘s fantastic imagery and playful use of the form of comics serves as an important influence for generations of comics and cartoons. Jeet Heer discusses McCay’s practice and place in the history of the world of comics in the Virginia Quarterly Review:

Created in the wake of the Chicago Columbian Exposition of 1893, Little Nemo was as much an architectural fantasy as a fairy tale. McCay delighted in creating pristine fictional palaces, rich in colonnades and endless hallways. Like a child playing in a sandlot, he also took pleasure in tearing down what he had so quickly created. The fertility of McCay’s imagination is both daunting and troubling. His mind moved too quickly to linger over his own creations too long. His need to create a quick succession of fresh images gives his work the rushed unreality of dreams, and sometimes the insubstantiality of dreams as well.

McCay’s most important innovation as an artist was his close attention to movement. Half a generation before McCay, the photographer Eadweard Muybridge had already revolutionized our sense of how bodies move through space with his time-lapse studies of horses. McCay never directly copied from photographs, relying instead on his remarkable eidetic memory, but he internalized the lessons of Muybridge. All of McCay’s characters, from flying mosquitoes to scampering little boys to trotting horses, move with the fluency of life. Because comics are a succession of images, frozen when seen in isolation but moving as we read the page, McCay’s attention to motion brought to the foreground the distinctive aesthetic of the art form.

McCay’s reliance on memory as his chief storehouse of images is further evidence of his deep insight into the nature of comics. Chris Ware, a sharp theorist of art as well as a greatly talented cartoonist, has repeatedly argued that comics are memory-drawings rather than life-drawings. “A cartoon is not an image taken from life,” Ware notes. “A cartoon is taken from memory. You’re trying to distill the memory of an experience, not the experience itself.” Unlike a painter or an illustrator working in front of a model, a cartoonist is drawing images in sequence that must possess narrative flow. Memories, which are fleeting images in a hazy sequence, are the closest cognitive parallel for how comics work. (Dreams, of course, are nighttime memories, sharing the sequential fuzziness of retrospective thought.)

Click through for a larger image.
This was posted 2 years ago. It has 81 notes. .

hyperallergic:

I first saw Dulce Pinzón’s “Superheroes” photography series (online, via Tumblr) right around the same time as Dina Goldstein’s “Fallen Princesses” series (also via Tumblr). The coincidence served as an interesting juxtaposition, as they both feature costumes embodying (very gendered, western) fantasies in order to challenge common perceptions. They work in opposite ways, however: Pinzón’s superheroes serve to use the fantasy to highlight and uplift the heroic work of Mexican Immigrants (each photo is accompanied by text stating the subject’s job and how much money he or she sends home to Mexico per month) — the costumes serve as metaphors for the hard, often unseen work that each does. Goldstein’s princesses, however, are using what are to be understood as real life settings in place of the fairy tale ones, challenging the happy ending each myth peddles (however unevenly — Princess Jasmine’s war-zone “real life” is unrealistically outlandish). Seen in tandem, the photo series comment on the power of the fantasy (and the fantasy’s costume) to sell us notions of power, gender roles, and other social conventions.

This was posted 3 years ago. It has 5 notes.
(W)rapping Signifiers: Kanye x Murakami + Murakami x Vuitton + Vuitton x Kanye / Pharrell + Pharrell x Nigo + Nigo x Kanye

readrapright:

The arithmetic is easy. Two producers-cum-rappers, two Japanese designers, one house of high fashion. Between them five configurations of fame. But of course that can’t be only what’s important.

Kanye West x 村上 隆

Collaborations between multitalented and…

This was posted 3 years ago. It has 5 notes.
pelikula:

Dream Theater  by Aldrin Calimlim 
Paprika (2006)  D: Satoshi Kon  S: Megumi Hayashibara, Katsunosuke Hori, Tōru Furuya 
One might be forgiven for accusing Christopher Nolan of stealing much of the dream logic that governs Satoshi Kon’s fantastical film, Paprika, and using it as the underlying conceit of his latest blockbuster, Inception, which Paprika predates by no more than four years. While Nolan, speaking in promotional interviews and contributing to production notes, seems to have never seen Kon’s animated feature, both films curiously share a good number of props and elements in common: collapsing nightmares, subconscious detectives, repressed hopes, shattered images, maddening anxieties, and most important, communal and multileveled dreams. 
Like most motion pictures done in the manner of anime, Paprika is set in the vaguely foreseeable future. Joint advances in electronics engineering and psychotherapy have led to the invention and further development of a device that lets physicians enter the dreams of their patients and, subconsciously, gradually rid them of their psychic tensions and maladjustments. Known as the “DC Mini” and touted to represent “the hope that shines on the new horizons of psychiatric treatment,” this device is yet to be legally approved and mass-produced (only four prototypes are currently in use) and only a handful of persons, including Dr. Torataro Shima, the wise old chief of laboratory, and Dr. Kosaku Tokita, the obese and child-at-heart genius inventor of the DC Mini, have access to its capacity and proper knowledge of its operation. Foremost among this exclusive group of scientists, though, is Dr. Atsuko Chiba, a beautiful psychotherapist whose technique of treating patients involves infiltrating their dreams while assuming the persona of her younger dreamworld alter-ego, Paprika. 
Paprika is quite literally the proverbial “girl of one’s dreams” to many of the patients whose dreams she penetrates. She might also be a minor, if also a bit too literal, example of a “manic pixie dream girl” since she, in a rather twisted sense, teaches patients—to borrow a portion of the definition of said type of character by film critic Nathan Rabin—“to embrace life and its infinite mysteries and adventures.” Attractive, affable, and astute, she sports a flaming mop of hair and a lively disposition that recall her namesake condiment. In a dream shared with Paprika, one is, more often than not, hard-pressed to hold out against her well-intentioned suggestions. 
It’s this combination of intelligence and charm that is put to the test when one of the DC Minis is stolen. In the hands of dutiful and professionally trained individuals like Atsuko, the DC Mini proves to be a valuable instrument in helping patients overcome their psychological problems, but in the hands of corrupt and technologically savvy terrorists, it becomes a lethal weapon capable of manipulating the dreams of other people. Before long, Shima is driven to insanity by a strange “daydream” and attempts to commit suicide and Tokita gets trapped in an equally strange dream and adopts the body of a toy robot. It’s up to Atsuko/Paprika to catch the thief, reestablish the line separating dreams and reality, and save the world, preferably before bedtime. 
If this sounds dizzying and nonsensical, it’s because it is at first. Paprika, based on Yasutaka Tsutsui’s 1993 landmark science fiction novel and adapted and directed as it was by the virtuosic Kon, is suffused with numerous incongruities that stress the film’s central battle between order and chaos and, oddly enough, emphasize the possibility of finding meaning in the mundane. Here a surreal parade of supposedly inanimate objects, such as a refrigerator, a fire hydrant, and a replica of the Statue of Liberty, among many others, now mobile as though bipedal, is a frequent occurrence. So is the haunting image of a violent but poker-faced Japanese doll. So is the suggestion that dreams are no different from cinema and the Internet in their treatment of people’s repressions. And so are incoherent sentences like “The sign is good fortune. The ceiling fan brings a message releasing epithets,” and “The dense forest turns into a shopping district. The 24-bit eggplant will be analyzed,” enthusiastically announced by characters whose dreams are invaded and comically reminiscent of the similarly disruptive and perplexing one-liners in Don DeLillo’s postmodern novel, White Noise, which, incidentally, also deals with how people absorb and process information. With Paprika, Kon reminds his audience that words and symbols, whether encountered in the distorted planes of dreams or in the broad daylight of reality, as well as icons, personal and political both, are more than capable of defining—and destroying—a person. 
 Paprika echoes most of the themes Kon cultivated in his previous films. In its essaying of the precariousness of a double life and the merging of fact and fiction, it closely resembles his directorial debut film, Perfect Blue, and his follow-up, Millennium Actress. To a lesser extent, its strange milieus parallel the idiosyncrasies of the characters in Tokyo Godfathers. But to compare Paprika with Nolan’s Inception, which in hindsight is nothing more than a set of five action/fantasy/adventure films cleverly interlaced to transmit a semblance of functional harmony and reduce their individual levels of stridency, in order to get a handle on this wildly imaginative animated film’s flair and exuberance is to do the late visionary director and his work a mild disservice. Paprika is in a league of its own. It is a truly bravura cinematic creation, a Mobius stream of (sub)consciousness, a landscape where truth and reason are found nowhere and everywhere.

pelikula:

Dream Theater
by Aldrin Calimlim 

Paprika (2006) 
D: Satoshi Kon 
S: Megumi Hayashibara, Katsunosuke Hori, Tōru Furuya 

One might be forgiven for accusing Christopher Nolan of stealing much of the dream logic that governs Satoshi Kon’s fantastical film, Paprika, and using it as the underlying conceit of his latest blockbuster, Inception, which Paprika predates by no more than four years. While Nolan, speaking in promotional interviews and contributing to production notes, seems to have never seen Kon’s animated feature, both films curiously share a good number of props and elements in common: collapsing nightmares, subconscious detectives, repressed hopes, shattered images, maddening anxieties, and most important, communal and multileveled dreams.

Like most motion pictures done in the manner of anime, Paprika is set in the vaguely foreseeable future. Joint advances in electronics engineering and psychotherapy have led to the invention and further development of a device that lets physicians enter the dreams of their patients and, subconsciously, gradually rid them of their psychic tensions and maladjustments. Known as the “DC Mini” and touted to represent “the hope that shines on the new horizons of psychiatric treatment,” this device is yet to be legally approved and mass-produced (only four prototypes are currently in use) and only a handful of persons, including Dr. Torataro Shima, the wise old chief of laboratory, and Dr. Kosaku Tokita, the obese and child-at-heart genius inventor of the DC Mini, have access to its capacity and proper knowledge of its operation. Foremost among this exclusive group of scientists, though, is Dr. Atsuko Chiba, a beautiful psychotherapist whose technique of treating patients involves infiltrating their dreams while assuming the persona of her younger dreamworld alter-ego, Paprika.

Paprika is quite literally the proverbial “girl of one’s dreams” to many of the patients whose dreams she penetrates. She might also be a minor, if also a bit too literal, example of a “manic pixie dream girl” since she, in a rather twisted sense, teaches patients—to borrow a portion of the definition of said type of character by film critic Nathan Rabin—“to embrace life and its infinite mysteries and adventures.” Attractive, affable, and astute, she sports a flaming mop of hair and a lively disposition that recall her namesake condiment. In a dream shared with Paprika, one is, more often than not, hard-pressed to hold out against her well-intentioned suggestions.

It’s this combination of intelligence and charm that is put to the test when one of the DC Minis is stolen. In the hands of dutiful and professionally trained individuals like Atsuko, the DC Mini proves to be a valuable instrument in helping patients overcome their psychological problems, but in the hands of corrupt and technologically savvy terrorists, it becomes a lethal weapon capable of manipulating the dreams of other people. Before long, Shima is driven to insanity by a strange “daydream” and attempts to commit suicide and Tokita gets trapped in an equally strange dream and adopts the body of a toy robot. It’s up to Atsuko/Paprika to catch the thief, reestablish the line separating dreams and reality, and save the world, preferably before bedtime. 

If this sounds dizzying and nonsensical, it’s because it is at first. Paprika, based on Yasutaka Tsutsui’s 1993 landmark science fiction novel and adapted and directed as it was by the virtuosic Kon, is suffused with numerous incongruities that stress the film’s central battle between order and chaos and, oddly enough, emphasize the possibility of finding meaning in the mundane. Here a surreal parade of supposedly inanimate objects, such as a refrigerator, a fire hydrant, and a replica of the Statue of Liberty, among many others, now mobile as though bipedal, is a frequent occurrence. So is the haunting image of a violent but poker-faced Japanese doll. So is the suggestion that dreams are no different from cinema and the Internet in their treatment of people’s repressions. And so are incoherent sentences like “The sign is good fortune. The ceiling fan brings a message releasing epithets,” and “The dense forest turns into a shopping district. The 24-bit eggplant will be analyzed,” enthusiastically announced by characters whose dreams are invaded and comically reminiscent of the similarly disruptive and perplexing one-liners in Don DeLillo’s postmodern novel, White Noise, which, incidentally, also deals with how people absorb and process information. With Paprika, Kon reminds his audience that words and symbols, whether encountered in the distorted planes of dreams or in the broad daylight of reality, as well as icons, personal and political both, are more than capable of defining—and destroying—a person. 

 Paprika echoes most of the themes Kon cultivated in his previous films. In its essaying of the precariousness of a double life and the merging of fact and fiction, it closely resembles his directorial debut film, Perfect Blue, and his follow-up, Millennium Actress. To a lesser extent, its strange milieus parallel the idiosyncrasies of the characters in Tokyo Godfathers. But to compare Paprika with Nolan’s Inception, which in hindsight is nothing more than a set of five action/fantasy/adventure films cleverly interlaced to transmit a semblance of functional harmony and reduce their individual levels of stridency, in order to get a handle on this wildly imaginative animated film’s flair and exuberance is to do the late visionary director and his work a mild disservice. Paprika is in a league of its own. It is a truly bravura cinematic creation, a Mobius stream of (sub)consciousness, a landscape where truth and reason are found nowhere and everywhere.

This was posted 3 years ago. It has 55 notes. .
Master of pop decay and nauseatingly bright color Takeshi Murakami&#8217;s current exhibition at Chateau de Versailles is the current must-see event in the art world. And honestly, wouldn&#8217;t you love to see these katamari of delight set against classic French decadence?

Master of pop decay and nauseatingly bright color Takeshi Murakami’s current exhibition at Chateau de Versailles is the current must-see event in the art world. And honestly, wouldn’t you love to see these katamari of delight set against classic French decadence?

This was posted 3 years ago. It has 2 notes. .